A History of Mountains and People
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Writers and Musicians

Barbara Kingsolver
A prize-winning author from Southwestern Virginia, Barbara Kingsolver is author of Prodigal Summer, The Poisonwood Bible, and Small Wonder. Winner of the National Humanities Award.

Mary Lee Settle
Winner of the National Book Award in 1978 and Co-founder of the PEN Awards,  Mary Lee Settle was one of America’s most renowned novelists. Her four part series entitled The Beulah Quartet is regarded as a classic of historical fiction writing.  A native of Charleston, West Virginia, Mary Lee Settle was also the author of Addie, a memoir of her grandmother.

Loyal Jones
Nicknamed the “Father of Appalachian Studies.”  Founder of the Appalachian Study Center at Berea College in Berea, Kentucky, His works include In The Heart, a highly regarded study of Appalachian religious belief and practice, as well as numerous other books and articles on Appalachian history and culture and humor.

Edward O. Wilson
Author of two Pulitzer Prize-winning books, E. O. Wilson is a chaired professor of Ecology at Harvard University. His works include Consilience, The Future of Life, and Ants.

Denise Giardina
Award-winning novelist and Episcopal deacon from Charleston, West Virginia.  Author of Storming Heaven, Saints and Villains, and The Unquiet Earth, for which she won the Lillian Smith Award in 1993.

Tom Gish
Editor-in-chief for more than thirty years of the Pulitzer Prize-winning newspaper The Mountain Eagle in Whitesburg, Kentucky.  Newspaper motto:  “It Screams.”

Edwin Bernbaum
Author of Sacred Mountains of the World, winner of the Commonwealth Prize for Best Non-fiction book of the Year.  Dr. Bernbaum is Senior Research Fellow at The Mountain Institute in West Virginia.

Wilma Dykeman
Author of more than eighteen books of both history and fiction, most of which dealt with Appalachia, including The French Broad, Return the Innocent Earth, Seeds of Southern Change, Neither Black nor White, and The Tall Woman.

Jefferson Chapman
Director of the McClung Museum at the University of Tennessee and Professor of Archeology.  Jeff Chapman is author of Tellico Archeology: 12,000 Years of Native American History.

Charles Hudson
Franklin Professor of Anthropology at the University of Georgia.  Author of The Southeastern Indians, as well as Knights of Spain, Warriors of the Sun: Hernando DeSoto and the South’s Ancient Chiefdoms.

Ron Eller
Director of the Appalachian Center at the University of Kentucky and author of Miners, Millhands, and Mountaineers, a seminal work on the history of economic development in Appalachia. His most recent book, Uneven Ground: Appalachia Since 1945, won the 2009 Weatherford Prize for non-fiction

Gurney Norman
Novelist, short story writer and filmmaker, Gurney Norman is author of Kinfolks: The Wilgus Stories and Divine Right’s Trip, which originally appeared in serial form in The Last Whole Earth Catalog.  Gurney Norman is a native of Eastern Kentucky and professor of creative writing at the University of Kentucky

Robert Hatcher
Chairman of the Geology Department at the University of Tennessee and prolific writer on the geology of the Appalachian Mountain range.

Robert Zahner
Professor Emeritus of Biology, Ecology and Forestry at the University of Michigan and Clemson University.  Author of The Mountain at the End of the Trail.

Chris Bolgiano
Faculty Emeritus at James Madison University and author of several books on environmental subjects, including The Appalachian Forest: A Search for Roots and Renewal and Living in the Appalachian Forest: True Tales of Sustainable Forestry.

Theda Perdue
Professor of History at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, widely known for her work on Cherokee culture and history.  She is the author of Slavery and the Evolution of Cherokee Society, Native Carolinians, Cherokee Women, and The Cherokee Removal: A Brief History.

Kenton Coe, Composer
A native of Johnson City, Tennessee, Kenton Coe has worked with the James Agee Film Project for over thirty years. He is the author of several award-winning operas and musical plays as well as film scores for all of the feature documentary productions of the James Agee Film Project.

University of Tennessee Orchestra under the direction of James Fellenbaum.

Katie Doman, Traditional Music Producer
Independent scholar of Appalachian Studies. Dr. Doman co-chaired the Appalachian Music task force for the 2003 Smithsonian Folklife Festival. She is a singer/songwriter and traditional ballad singer who holds a Ph.D in English from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

Roy Andrade, Composer and Musician
Former member of the Reeltime Travelers, Roy Andrade continues to perform across the United States and teaches for the Bluegrass, Old Time and Country Music Program at East Tennessee State University.

 

 

Scholars

Jefferson Chapman, Ph.D.
Director of the McClung Museum at the University of Tennessee and Professor of Archeology.  Professor Chapman is author of Tellico Archeology: 12,000 Years of Native American History.

Robert Coles, M.D.
Professor of Psychiatry and Medical Humanities at Harvard University. He is author of the Children of Crisis series, which won the Pulitzer Prize in 1968 and focuses in part on the children of Appalachia.  In addition, he has written numerous critical works about Appalachian and Southern literature, including book-length work on James Agee.  He was awarded a MacArthur Prize in 1980.

Wilma Dykeman, L.H.D.
A novelist and non-fiction writer who teaches literature at the University of Tennessee. She has written on a wide variety of subjects involving the culture and people of Appalachia.  Her works include The Tall Woman, Seeds of Southern Change, Neither Black nor White, The French Broad, and The Far Family.

Ronald Eller, Ph.D.
University of Kentucky.  Director of the Appalachian Center at the University of Kentucky and author of Miners, Millhands, and Mountaineers, a seminal work on the history of economic development in Appalachia.

Jean Haskell, Ph.D.
Former Director of the Center for Appalachian Studies and Services at East Tennessee State University.  Ms. Haskell is the Co-Editor of the Encyclopedia of Appalachia, as well as the author of many articles and films about Appalachian culture.  The Appalachian Study Center at ETSU will be working on this series as a co-producing entity.

Charles Hudson, Ph.D.
Franklin Professor of Anthropology at the University of Georgia.  Author of The Southeastern Indians, as well as Knights of Spain, Warriors of the Sun:  Hernando DeSoto and the South’s Ancient Chiefdoms.

John Inscoe, Ph.D.
Professor of History at the University of Georgia and Editor of the Georgia Historical Quarterly. John Inscoe is a leading expert on the Civil War and the Southern Appalachians.  He is author of Mountain Masters, Slavery, and the Sectional Crisis in Western North Carolina.

Loyal Jones, Ph.D.
Nicknamed the “Father of Appalachian Studies.”  Founder of the Appalachian Study Center at Berea College in Berea, Kentucky, His works include In The Heart, a highly regarded study of Appalachian religious belief and practice, as well as numerous other books and articles on Appalachian history and culture.

Ron Lewis, Ph.D.
Professor of History at West Virginia University.  Ron Lewis is a section editor for the Encyclopedia of Appalachia as well as one of the foremost historians of Appalachia and West Virginia. His work includes Transforming the Appalachian Countryside: Railroads, Deforestation, and Social Change.

Theda Perdue, Ph.D.
Professor of History at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, widely known for her work on Cherokee culture and history.  She is the author of Slavery and the Evolution of Cherokee Society, Native Carolinians, Cherokee Women, and The Cherokee Removal: A Brief History.

Scott Southworth, Ph.D.
Staff geologist at the United States Geological Survey in Reston, Virginia, and specialist in the geology of Appalachia. Dr. Southworth’s particular specialty is in the study of relationship between geology and social development.

Specialists

Rudy Abramson
Co-Editor of The Encyclopedia of Appalachia.  He has had a long career in journalism, having worked as the Washington correspondent for the Los Angeles Times. His work includes Hallowed Ground: Preserving America’s Heritage.

George Constantz, Ph.D., Science Writer

Writer and forest ecologist. Author of

Hollows, Peepers, and Highlanders: An Appalachian Mountain Ecology.


Paul Delcourt, Ph.D.
Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Tennessee.  Co-author of Prehistoric Native Americans and Ecological Change.

Hazel Delcourt, Ph.D.
Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Tennessee.  Author of Reading Landscapes of the Past.  Co-author of Prehistoric Native Americans and Ecological Change.

John Ehle
Novelist and Historian, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. A native of Asheville, North Carolina, his works include A History of the Eastern Band of the Cherokees, Trail of Tears and several novels set in Western North Carolina.

Robert Zahner,  Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Biology, Ecology and Forestry at the University of Michigan and Clemson University.  Author of The
Mountain at the End of the Trail
.